How should you begin if I want to learn about and enjoy wine? Here is a simple wine primer for the budding wine lover.
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Written on October 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

Every wine has certain organoleptic characteristics which are different from any other. For this reason, every wine should be served in a proper glass capable of exalting its characteristics. Wine glasses come in different shapes and characteristics, sometimes considered as “extreme” because of some producers who tend to make specific shapes and styles, not only for certain wines, but also for specific wines made of certain grapes or coming from certain areas. The shape of glass helps a wine to express better and every glass usually is the result of specific studies and researches, both on the organoleptic perception of aromas and flavors, as well as on characteristics and physical conditions that favor their perception.
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Written on October 20th, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

A vineyard can produce a great wine one year and yield something barely drinkable the next. Why the inconsistency, and how concerned should you be about vintages? The bottom line is that unless you have a cellar for storing wine, you are going to be drinking what your market has available. So you needn’t worry too much about a particular vintage/year. Of course look for great vintages when and where they may be available, but realize you will pay dearly for them. If you want to see the difference that vintage makes, try a side-by-side comparison of the same wine from one vineyard from a range of years. This is often a very instructive exercise and you might find out that the differences between vintages, although quite discernable, are much more subtle than you had expected.
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Written on October 20th, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

Most of the words professional “wine people” use about wine are standard and widely accepted terms for delineating particular characteristics. This specific language helps those who are in the wine business to communicate with one another and understand complex concepts without the need for tedious explanation. The full spectrum of wine language includes terms that are too technical and obscure for people with only a general interest in wine to understand. However, there are words that can aid you in understanding wine books, reviews, and wine people in general. Many of these terms are related so be sure to review the capitalized terms used in some of the definitions.
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Written on October 19th, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

When pairing wine to food try to match similarities of richness, texture, intensity, and flavor of the food to the wine. Here are some tips:
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Written on September 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

Ordering wine is a responsibility, but it can be fun as well. Any good establishment will have someone — a sommelier or wine captain — to help you choose an appropriate wine. A good sommelier (or waiter) will act neither overbearingly stuffy nor overly friendly. That experienced person’s help, plus a few simple tips and tricks, will help you make the right choice (or at least one that is not embarrassing).
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Written on September 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

Wine Name

The standards for naming a wine vary depending on its origin. In many European countries a wine is named for the growing area or appellation where it originated. For example, Bordeaux Supérieur or Chablis are all French ACs (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée); Chianti is an Italian DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata Garantita), and Rioja is a Spanish DOCa (Denominación de Origen Calificada). In some areas like the United States , Australia , New Zealand , South Africa , and South America , and in France ‘s Alsace region, the grape variety (such as Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay) is often the name of the wine. Proprietary names are sometimes used when a wine doesn’t fit into either of the previous guidelines. For example, a wine might be a Cabernet Sauvignon/Cabernet Franc/Merlot blend. Since it doesn’t contain 75 percent of one grape variety, it cannot (in the United States ) be named after a specific grape variety.
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Written on September 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

The quality of a wine depends largely on the quality of the grapes used. The goal of the production process is to maximize this quality.
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Written on August 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

Perhaps no region of the world personifies the warmth and graciousness of good food and great wine more completely than Tuscany. Its sunny slopes, medieval towns, and rich cultural history provide an irresistible setting for such inviting cuisine and wines. Throughout its colorful history, Tuscany has been a land of important artists and scientists, talented and forward-thinking merchants, and powerful politicians. Its castles, culture, and natural wonders make it a unique and memorable destination for millions of tourists every year. Tuscany’s museums, sights, and edible delights are unsurpassed. A special mystique and light envelops this region of Italy, distinct from anywhere else in Europe .
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Written on August 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine), Food

Port Wine is a fortified wine, as defined in EU legislation. It is produced in the Demarcated Region of the Douro under very specific conditions resulting from natural and human factors. The winemaking process, based on traditional methods, includes stopping the fermentation of the “must” by adding grape brandy, making a blend of 2 or more wines, and letting the wine age.
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Written on July 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine), Wines

What’s all the fuss about listening to “wine experts” telling us how good or bad a wine is? Do they really know more than the average wine drinker, and should we let them influence us in choosing wines to buy? Can wine competitions and tastings tell us anything about specific labels and varieties? How should we really pick and choose?
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Written on July 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

Drinking red wine and cooking with olive oil may help us to live longer, say scientists. Figures from the European Union show that people living in Mediterranean countries like Spain and Italy can expect to live longer on average than people in other countries. Key ingredients in both substances can significantly increase the lifespan of yeast. Since yeast and humans share many genes, scientists have speculated they may have the same effect in people. The findings provide more evidence to suggest that the Mediterranean diet may be the secret to living a long and healthy life.
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Written on July 21st, 2010 , Education (All About Wine)

Tour Wine

A Virtual Tour of Grapes, Wines, Wineries